Addition Stories

It’s been a rough year and we are just 8 months in. Who could have predicted all the wild and unbelievable that has already occurred?! One thing that hit us very personally was the sudden need for one of us to stay home and participate in the homeschooling of our daughter as spring break was extended and then online schooling began. A project we anticipated being a bit faster turned out to take a bit longer when the reality of homeschooling hit. Fortunately, we had amazing homeowners to work with for this addition project!

This home was built about 5 years ago and when we met our homeowners they were looking to extend their living room and extend their office in to a sitting area. Below are a few photos we snapped yesterday of the areas, check them out!

The first couple of photos of are the extended living room. The Structural Beams that were once outside were pulled inside and kept exposed instead of hidden.

In these next couple of photos, the windows were directly behind the barn door seen and the exterior wall for the office ended at the partition seen to the right in the photo. The exterior alcove was pushed out to make space for a sitting space with an electric fireplace to enjoy during the colder months.

Concrete Looks

For our current project we had to match the homes existing concrete stain to the newly poured floors. To do this, we asked the company that originally did the staining to come back.

Take a look at a couple of the photos of the fresh stain work next to the older work in the two spaces we added on to, it turned out FANTASTIC! As we wrap up the project, we will add more photos of everything together! Thanks to Concrete Visions out of Fort Collins for doing a great job.

When considering reasons for planning a concrete slab as a homes flooring, one huge perk is the Energy Efficiency of the slab. In the cold months the slab retains solar heat. The heat is then released as the interior of the house cools, helping maintain a comfortable temperature. In the summer time, and as long as solar heat gains are avoided (done by selective window placement, exterior facades or interior finishes such as window coverings), the slab helps keep the house cooler. Radiant tubes through the slab, using water, can also play a role in home energy efficiency by running warm water in the colder months and cool water in the warm months.

Lyons Bath

Over the winter, we had the opportunity to do a quick project for a friend needing a mother-in-law cottage/AUD (accessory unit dwelling) in Fort Collins. Having watched our process on the Fort Collins project and been a part of several job site talks, our friend wanted the dwelling to be as efficient as possible. The space was previously a garage, and had the interior walls already up. We came in and helped with ventilation, air sealing and the insulation.

As we wrapped up the insulation and got them through their rough inspections, they asked if we would be willing to do their bathroom tile as well, as they really wanted to get the space finished before the spring. They were doing most of the finish work themselves, but felt the pressure to get things wrapped up so that their mother could move in. Below are a couple of interior design renderings we put together to show them what the bathroom would look like. They really appreciated getting to see before hand what the space they were envisioning would look like. After a few adjustments to the original design, we got to work and the completed bathroom turned out fantastic!

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Above: Concept Drawings to Confirm Tile Look and Layout

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Above: Installed Tile 

A few of the things that changed were the glass door and the bench, which were a part of the original drawing.

Many homeowners often express that they are not able to imagine their home and the spaces within it based on construction documents alone. This coupled with picking tile, cabinets, fixtures, carpet, even wall colors can become a daunting task during a home build. Having well produced interior design renderings that can show what a space will look like based on the materials being considered and the dimensions called out, are such an important and helpful tool as they can help confirm choices and allow for changes to be made before moving forward with installations or big purchases.

Are you living on the Front Range and thinking about building a new home or an Accessory Dwelling Unit? If so, send us an email at dusty@harrington.build 

Building Efficient…Just Because

Do you ever watch the progression of home building developments? They are fast. It’s pretty incredible actually, just how quickly a new home can be built. One huge factor in the speed, is the repeatability and simplicity of the home. These homes are usually just meeting the building code requirements, not really going beyond and one of the biggest drawbacks to rapidly built home are the energy costs. Homeowners in many of these developments pay just as much to overcome the heating and cooling issues and overall quality of the house year after year as compared to the upfront cost of building efficient.

As climate change (it’s real bro) continues to affect our living environments, the costs of heating and cooling, due to the increased demand for comfort, become more expensive. That’s where having an efficient home can pay off. All too often we hear, “but it’s so expensive” or “it takes longer to build than those other guys” and to that I say, “what do you want the future of homes to look like?” Are we interested in moving forward with building homes that can’t perform in optimal ways? I hope not. I continue to hope that pushing for efficient homes will help to decrease the negative impacts we have on our planet and leave a better future for the generations to come; and good news, there’s plenty of other builders out there who feel the same.

Benefits of building a home as either a passive house or an efficient house that uses passive house techniques are: Less outside noise in the home due to the tightness of the building envelope. Increased in home air quality because of the use of air exchange units. Less demand for heating and cooling due to a tighter building envelope, better insulation, thoughtful placement of windows for solar gain and considerations for how a home is used by it’s occupants overall. To name a few.

We want to build a better home, to build a better community, to build a better future.

Building efficient…just because.

 

Building Away

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Even though many folks in Colorado are staying home, construction and home building is still progressing. New homes across the front range are in some form or phase of planning or permitting, many homes are actively being built, remodeled or added on to and our company is, as the Brit’s say, doing our best to keep calm and carry on.

Currently, we are just outside of Fort Collins working on an addition to a passive home that was built about 6 years ago and designed by DNA Design + Architecture, who designed the Loveland Project (see previous posts) home we built. This home is really very beautiful. The design elements find balance among the prairie landscape of the foothills. From large steel beams, to reclaimed barn wood and a stucco color that compliments the hues of the local and native plants, everything is well thought out and planned with intention. We’ll include some photos once we have it completed.

If you’re looking to build a home here in Northern Colorado, check out our Welcome page for our contact information. We look forward to continuing to build interesting, creative, beautiful and most importantly- efficient and sustainable, homes here in Colorado.

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Tile Looks

This post will focus on the tile and stone looks from our Fort Collins project that we wrapped up in September. Our in house designer Dusty helped to make sure that the colors and sizes the homeowners had envisioned with their interior designer during planning, could be sourced and met the budget requirements.

Kitchen

Backsplash: Daltile Clio Mosaics Random in Hera

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In our last post we showed off some of the counter tops in the kitchen, such as the waterfall island.  Counter tops: Daltile One Quartz in Morning Frost and Absolute Black Granite. The back splash at the island is the Daltile Portfolio in Charcoal.

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All bathrooms in the house also received the One Quartz Morning Frost for the counter top.

Powder Room

The powder room has a floating cabinet with four drawer fronts however we designed the box to only house two drawers, both the length of the box. Given that it is the powder room, our homeowners felt there wasn’t much need for multiple drawers.  The cabinet wall is floor to ceiling Daltile Clio Mosaics in Hera, the same as the kitchen. On the Floor: Portfolio in Charcoal @ 12×24.

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Master Bathroom

Our homeowners wanted a little color in their master bathroom and to achieve this we went with Dalitle Colorwave Green Parade. It really is a fun accent to the room! On the Shower Walls is Ottimo Elektra Lux and on the Floor is Daltile Avery

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Hall Bath

The upper hall bath in our project has Daltile Bee Hive large format hexagon tiles. We used three colors, Grey, White and AshGrey. On the walls is Daltile Cove Creek Off White 4″x16″ tiles. The cabinet in this bathroom is also a floating cabinets with 4 drawers.

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3rd Master Bath

Several of the tiles in the house were used in multiple locations. For the 3rd floor master bath, Daltile Avery, seen on the floor of the master bath posted above, is used on the walls. Daltile Portfolio Charcoal in 12″x24″ is on the floor and a 6″x24″ at the wall inset. The use of the large format tiles really accentuated the tall walls and gave a lot of character to the space. The shower door is a full swing glass door. The shower wall inset was an idea we had after our homeowners requested a built out shower bench. To save space and avoid any code issues we decided to build into the wall, giving the shower it’s own interesting feature.

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The mudroom and lower level bathroom in the house used elongated subway tiles, also from Daltile.

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Thanks for checking out our tile features!

Next Post: A few photos of the Exterior Details!

 

Stairway View

Our Fort Collins project features several large windows and sliding doors, mainly at the patio locations on both the second and third floor. The particular window seen in this series is at the intersection of the second and third floor stairway and was quite fun to install. It certainly creates a dramatic look from both outside and inside. The homeowner is considering the trendy glass globe cluster chandelier as the feature lighting for this space; which will really add an elegance to the steel and wood stairway which it overhangs!

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Curley Metal Fabrication

We work hard to find good people to work with. People who can understand our process, who are interested in what we do, like what we do, and who want to be a part of what we do. We also want to work with people who like  what they do and take pride in their work.

 

IMG_20180523_085740767IMG_20180523_085855307For our Fort Collins project there are exposed beams throughout the home, a custom multi-floor stair rail and custom patio railings going in. We met Ben Curley, owner of Curley Metal Fabrication, about a year before work began. While he does do structural work, he also has several other types of fabricated metal work projects. Projects like gates, metal screens, planter boxes and artistic work. You can see some of the projects he has done at his Facebook page: https://m.facebook.com/CurleyMetalFabrication/

We have enjoyed working with Ben and continue to look forward to working with him throughout this project and in other projects. Everyone we have met on his team have been easy to work with, understanding, competent and responsible. They care about their work, making sure everything is done right and well before leaving and it shows.

Video of the fabrication to come!

 

 

 

 

 

Tight Squeezes

Lets hear it for Bryan, who occasionally gets the Bobcat into some precarious places, and then back out again. He’s like a lion tamer-only it is a Bobcat (not the animal obviously) and he’s just a quiet construction guy weilding a tool bag instead of a whip. 3 cheers for Bryan!

As we showed you last week, sometimes we do what we have to do to get the work done. It isn’t always easy, especially when you are running a large piece of equipment and you have to be mindful of all the places you can’t go.

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